Paws 4 thought: Ffald-y-Brenin and a prophetic promise

 

Paws4thort 4Let’s linger in south-west Wales before continuing on our journey to tell about the Days of Wonder gathering in Cardiff. Would you spend some moments to muse with me over a few things?

Offered a refreshing cup of tea upon arrival at the Newport Links hotel, Nina took it to seats looking down to the beach. There, she met a fellow guest who, it so happened, had returned for dinner from Ffald-y-Brenin. Clearly a ‘divine appointment’, and Jane and Nina chatted away as only those who’ve got an exceptionally special person in common can do.

The clean atmosphere of the Newport area plus its fascinating house of prayer at Fflad-y-Brenin made a deep impact which still affects us two weeks later, even though we were visiting friends and not participating in its daily prayer rhythm. Although my 2013 post on Revival in Wales and the Outpouring in Cwmbran briefly referred to this place, I hadn’t done any background reading whatsoever prior to our trip.

Years ago I wrote a paper for Reading churches on its Abbey’s history and the town’s Viking period and battles in 870s AD with the future king Alfred the Great. So, I was also aware of  the history of the ancient British Celtic Church, especially in its Northumbrian king Oswald’s treaties in 630s AD at Dorchester-on-Thames with heathen Mercian king Cynegils and the Roman Catholic missionary Birinus.  Earlier studies had taken me into the history of the early British church. (For example, 6th century historian Gildas posits the Gospel’s arrival in the later years of Tiberius Caesar’s reign, circa 40 AD. In AD 177 Eleutherius of Rome wrote to king Lucius in answering how to conduct himself as a Christian in the kingdom of Britain.)  However, all that past information was deeply submerged in the recesses of my mind.

I came to South Wales in blissful ignorance to enjoy a refreshing short holiday.

So, what I blogged earlier in the 2nd part of my ‘regenerating week in Wales’ was a very basic personal impression. However, as I completed it I realised some details would help readers who are interested in the retreat. So I copied in extracts from the Trust’s website. Also, just after publishing it I got a nudge to search on Google and immediately noticed a blog I’d quoted previously on Wales in the historically erudite Diebach-welldigger.

Therefore, I scanned David Edward Pike’s personal account of The Grace Outpouring and quoted his closing remarks on a roaring lion – without having read it in full.

Imagine my surprise upon doing so at leisure later. Here are details not only about the origins of Ffald-y-Brenin but also on 6th century Celtic saint Brynach’s time spent on the mountain its built upon. Which is why that place is named ‘The Hill of Angels’.

Carn Ingli in distance

Over the mountain road from Ffald-y-Brenin to Fishguard we stopped for lunch up on the col and walked up to the tor shown above, from which the top of Carn Ingli may be seen in the distance. It was a good place from which to speak out blessings to family and everyone in the area.

Speaking a Blessing

Diebach’s account of the retreat centre refers to a couple of supernatural events I wish to draw your attention to. One is on the solitary cross and its origin.

The other event is the lion that appeared to a pastor from Africa in the beehive chapel and the reference to the four points of the compass. I wish to refer to the significance of that when blogging about the Days of Wonder gathering in Cardiff. Peculiar as it may seem to those who have no grid for the supernatural, I can attest that a huge lion was seen to walk through our local church. Only when a visitor reported having seen it did I know I wasn’t imagining it!

Also for those who wish to know more, I recommend a fellow reader’s travelogue on his St David’s to Leominster Prayer Walk. This is apposite to Pembrokeshire as well as in connection with my remarks in A spiritual slant to the Olympic torch’s route, viz:

I was intrigued to learn from a fellow reader of an encouraging encounter with some Welsh Christians during his hike from Newport, Wales to the Lizard in Cornwall . This group had been in contact with people involved in new age etc and had been told “such groups were aware something was going on in the spiritual realm”!!

Mark’s call to the prayer walk was directly connected to the London 2012 Olympics, which are related to the Queen’s Silver Jubilee about which I wrote several posts on the prophetic significance of the Jubilee Bells.

Yet of particular interest is his reference to his key prayer theme on the walk as being confirmed by the restoration of St David’s shrine in the very year of his walk, AND this is identical to the ‘unexpected hint’ from Matt 19:28 referred to in part 1 of our journey. Also, Mark writes that the statue of David has a dove by his shoulder and his holding a Bible, which signifies the combined foundation of the Word and the Holy Spirit, which is also the message of Smith Wigglesworth’s prophetic vision.

About a prophetic promise

Of all the hundreds of prophetic words I’ve blogged about, only one has resulted in a hostile response and slanderous slur upon my character. It relates to the report from Roger of what happened during one of the prayer times at Ffald-y-Brenin when it was considered that Jesus is “calling the Anglican church out of Lazarus’ cave”.

I had intellectual reservations yet it seemed right in my spirit, and it’s timing fell in with a related vision that had come to an Anglican Ordinand on retreat with several others. So I reported it, but a visitor to this blog challenged it.  Now there’s absolutely nothing wrong with that and I respect everyone’s opinion and gave it serious consideration.

Yet my explanation was rejected and the report scorned by that bibliolater; ie. someone who thinks their interpretation and application of scripture is sacrosanct. His reference to what Jesus said at Matthew 24 and assumption it means me, indicates his grasp of scripture is not as sound as it could be. That is, he uses eisegesis not exegesis. That is, there’s an incorrect inference because the plain meaning isn’t taken into context either then or as applied to now.  [Thank you The Bishop Dr. for the excellent explanation, What’s with those “Gesis” brothers?]

This critic doesn’t follow Jesus’ instruction about not judging and condemning another. In my opinion it’s wiser to let the Accuser of the brethren do its own dirty work – and if what I reported is actually a work of the Holy Spirit, that soul has possibly committed an unforgiveable sin.

Therefore, I can only conclude satan is very unhappy with this claim about the Anglican Church. Consequently, that prophetic promise on ‘Lazarus cave’ may well be from the Holy Spirit. Having now been to Ffald-y-Brenin and sensed the brooding presence of the Holy Spirit there, I am even more confident of the validity of what Roger shared on revival within England’s established church.

What’s more – this isn’t the first instance of our adversary’s use of heresy hunters over revival in Wales, as noted in this post about Chuck Pierce’s prophetic word on Wales.

A validation?

What may we expect for evidence that the Anglicans are ‘reviving’ or coming out of a tomb, like Lazarus when Jesus called him forth?

Perhaps one noticeable change would be the reversal of centuries of anti-Semitism practised for centuries by the traditional, established churches – and as promulgated by ‘replacement theology’ (the false idea that God no longer has any covenant with the Jews because the new one instituted by Jesus Christ has superseded it).

So let’s take serious note of remarks by leading blogger, His Grace Cranmer. In Welby: “Israel has the same legitimate rights to peace and security as any other state, he writes,

When did you last hear an Anglican bishop, let alone the Archbishop of Canterbury, support Israel’s historic and legal rights? When did you least hear a bishop of the Church of England advocate militarised self-defence as the only rational path to peace when confronted by murderous Jew-haters who conceal their bombs below hospitals, their rockets in clinics, and their guns and grenades in schools and mosques?

In drawing Anglicans toward a better understanding of His work with the Jews – exactly as Jesus’ friend Lazarus would have well known – then perhaps the Lord really is reviving this part of His body, as not only surmised upon Archbishop Welby’s enthronement (New era for the Church refers) but also as heard recently during the regular prayers at this renowned retreat in South Wales.

Now, come for an awesome time in Cardiff >>

4 thoughts on “Paws 4 thought: Ffald-y-Brenin and a prophetic promise

  1. Bless you Richard – encouraging words!
    I’d recommend ‘St Paul in Britain’ (a free download from the internet); written by Rev Morgan from Wales in 1860… he writes very little about the legend of St Paul preaching in Britain, but he does outline a version of Joseph of Arimathea coming to Somerset in AD 37, with, it is claimed, Mary the mother of Jesus, Mary Magdalen and Lazarus, amongst others! If this is the case, there are obvious links with various themes in your blog. (There are other books on the Joseph legend, such as ‘The Drama of the Lost Disciples’, which differ in detail but support the idea of a very early planting of the gospel in Britain.)
    I believe that the Celtic church was fanned into life by the joint ministries of the believers in Somerset and then those planted in South Wales by about AD 60 through the ministry of Caradoc (=Caractacus), Bran his father and others(see the British names of believers listed as some of those mentioned in Romans 16). It is no coincidence that out of the twelve monastic communities planted by St David (around the year 500), the FIRST was at Glastonbury (you can still visit his little chapel there, while the main abbey is in ruins). David was honouring his roots; he re-established the ailing community there and then went on to bless the rest of Wales/Britain as Jesus led him. I think there is a blessing if we bless our godly roots in our generation as well… not to get lost in the past, but to swiftly continue to build on good foundations as men and women of past generations/revials have done.
    And, this is key, the very early Celtic church had their sabbath on Saturday; they were planted by Jewish believers in Christ; they broke the Shabbat bread on a Friday evening for over 600 years.. until the spiritual battle was lost in 664 at Whitby. Hence the importance of your ‘pro-what God is doing in & through Israel’ stance in your blogs… that resonates with our good roots as well!
    Keep up the good blogging!
    God bless
    Mark

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    • Ta 4 tip, my friend. I read both fascinating books long before I became a believer but sadly no longer have them.

      My above references are from the many appendices of JW Taylor’s ‘The Coming of the Saints’. This deals in great detail with the journey across the Mediterranean of several of Jesus’ close disciples, and especially the evengelical mission of Lazarus, Mary & Martha and Mary Magdalene across the Marseilles region.

      All of this puts the lie to Dan Brown’s claims of a ‘Da Vinci code’. In fact I was very familiar with the stories behind that and of the best seller upon which it is based, the publisher of which decided to use the authors’ suppositions about Jesus and Mary to promote sales – very successfully too.

      So I was very well aware of these legends and interested to find a couple of chapters on the deeper connection between Israel and the ancient British church in The Invisible Hand, to which I refer in this blog’s About./Welcome…

      Like

  2. Ta 4 tip, my friend. I read both fascinating books long before I became a believer but sadly no longer have them.

    My above references are from the many appendices of JW Taylor’s ‘The Coming of the Saints’. This deals in great detail with the journey across the Mediterranean of several of Jesus’ close disciples, and especially the evengelical mission of Lazarus, Mary & Martha and Mary Magdalene across the Marseilles region.

    All of this puts the lie to Dan Brown’s claims of a ‘Da Vinci code’. In fact I was very familiar with the stories behind that and of the best seller upon which it is based, the publisher of which decided to use the authors’ suppositions about Jesus and Mary to promote sales – very successfully too.

    So I was very well aware of these legends and interested to find a couple of chapters on the deeper connection between Israel and the ancient British church in The Invisible Hand, to which I refer in this blog’s About./Welcome…

    Like

  3. Pingback: Vision of a lion – the four faces of God | Richard's Watch

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