The difference between good and bad secularism – a challenge to secularists

Courtesy Watcharakun at Freedigitalphotos.comVery well said sir. Your closing remarks support the question raised in yesterday’s post on Britain taking a totalitarian tack! Thank you Gillan for the link to the full article, which I too highly recommend, and enjoy your summer beak my friend.

God and Politics in the UK

Watching the news of President Morsi’s demise from power in Egypt over the last few weeks has been a reminder of the inherent dangers of allowing a religious  fundamentalist regime to take control of a country.  Morsi and his Muslim Brotherhood may have been democratically elected but he was an incompetent ruler who, in a pursuit of imposing a Islamist agenda on the Egyptian people, only managed to turn vast swathes of the population against him, including many who had voted for him in the Presidential election.  The tone and tenor of his administration was high-handed: trying to close shops at 10pm because people should be fresh for the morning prayer (Cairo is the city that never sleeps, where there are still traffic jams at 2am, and where Internet usage peaks at 12.45am); prosecuting journalists for insulting the President; calling people who didn’t agree with him “infidels.” Little legislation was passed. During…

View original post 1,177 more words

1 thought on “The difference between good and bad secularism – a challenge to secularists

Your contribution is warmly welcome (kindly note caveat in About Comments):

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s