Book review: ‘Rejection Hurts’ by Steve Hepden

Question: what does Steve Hepden’s first book ‘Explaining Rejection’ and a famous British radio telescope have in common?

I will share that personal point after quoting a couple of many endorsements to his latest book, followed by the publisher’s comments:

Rejection is such a huge heart issue, crippling multitudes of people and no doubt affecting us all. In this book ‘Rejection Hurts’, Steve Hepden will help you diagnose your issues, and then map out a way for you to come into acceptance, forgiveness and love. So helpful; so freeing; so life-giving.
John Arnott, Catch the Fire Toronto & Partners In Harvest International

This is a wonderful combination of pastoral and practical insights into the power and effects of rejection in today’s society. Through storytelling and compelling biblical insights Steve offers a wealth of resources to transform the negative equity of rejection into opportunities to find healing and wholeness.
Rev Dr Russ Parker, 2Restore: Healing Wounded Churches, Farnham, UK

‘We have a fundamental need to belong and rejection destabilises us and the resulting disconnection we feel only adds to the pain. Rejection powerfully effects our emotions, thinking and behaviour, which will undermine and weaken our own value and esteem, and also our perception of God.

‘This book gives a comprehensive view into the source, causes and roots of rejection and how it can affect us at any time in our lives. Rejection Hurts offers the reader a pathway towards recovery and release, based on a process of prayer ministry, which includes personal choice and responsibility and an acceptance of the love and power of God.’

Steve is an ordained minister with the Elim Church and has a Masters degree in Applied Theology. He’s married to Chris and they have two children and three grand-daughters. Coming from a Pentecostal/Charismatic perspective Steve later became a leader in an international healing ministry, which is where Nina and I independently met him long before we were married 15 years ago (this Saturday – happy anniversary sweetheart). Thus he’s been involved with planting churches and all forms of leadership in a pastoral and prophetical context.

Steve prefaces this updated version of Explaining Rejection by telling each reader,

“I am looking for understanding and hopefully some revelation to you personally. I trust that you will be enlightened and challenged.”

To that end, each chapter closes with ‘memory points’ for that personal ‘workout’, about which I will share below. In the first chapter I note his perspicacious explanation,

“Rejection is powerful enough to make you believe things that actually have not happened in the way you think they have. This is the subtleness of rejection and is something we need to recognise.”

I can highly recommend Rejection Hurts, especially for all those like ourselves who are involved in prayer ministry and counselling.

Purchase:

An electronic version is available on Kindle via Amazon.  Paperbacks cost £10 incl p&p and, if normal outlets are out-of-stock, may be bought direct from the author. Mail your cheque payable to ‘Steve Hepden’ with note of your address to:

Steve Hepden, 7 Linden Grove, Garstang, Preston, Lancs PR3 1FN

Personal

Now to answer my opening question: what does Steve’s first book ‘Explaining Rejection’ have in common with a famous British radio telescope?

As a new believer in Jesus Christ I wanted to get effects from my old life dealt with as fast and thoroughly as possible. I went to a meeting convened by a West Reading church known to my Baptist pastor, was impressed with the speaker Steve Hepden’s message and wanted to work in-depth upon some issues. So bought his book plus a train ticket from Reading to Lancaster for one of his courses. En-route I finished reading another book, then opened up ‘Explaining’.

As normal, I flicked backwards for epilogue, end-notes and index to get an idea of an author’s sources – but instead I found a list of questions and decided to read it. The first of several childhood-related questions was, ‘What’s your earliest happy memory?

Immediately, I recalled the times in mid-1950s when my father drove us, along with my mother’s mother, to see the University of Manchester’s radio telescope being built at Jodrell Bank in Cheshire. (My grandparents had given me a most fascinating, illustrated book for my 7th birthday By Space Ship To The Moon, as G’ma was very interested.)

Lovell Telescope, Jodrell Bank Observatory

Musing in that fond memory I gazed out of the train’s window at the very moment it went practically alongside that telescope!

A jaw-dropping ‘God-incident’: not only in its astonishing timing but also because the train was not supposed  to be there – I thought its schedule continued northwards from Crewe to Lancaster via Warrington. Instead it had taken a looped detour north-eastwards for Manchester Piccadilly. And what’s more, in doing so it first had to travel through my hometown of Stockport!  Many memories of my youth quickly awakened – then upon arrival in Lancaster the first fellow delegate I met was from my hometown!!  A truly mind-blowing start to an exceptional few days led by Steve Hepden.

Furthermore, within a few years that ministry had opened a centre in Farnham, Surrey, and one Christmas Steve was speaking there. As I was sat near a tall decorated fir tree I was reminded of one’s significance in connection with the Lord’s visitation in 1989, as told here.

Steve would never have known the remark – and its timing – made to emphasis a point in his message had completely described the impact of what happened in that dream. As I reminisced about Jesus swooping down to me from the sky and bursting through the wall of the room I was dreaming I was in, Steve exclaimed, “Can you imagine how stunned Jesus’ disciples were when He walked though that room’s locked door?”

Answer, “Yes I can, ‘cos I’ve seen it!”

So I’m sure you’ll find a treasure trove in Steve’s new book…

Your contribution is warmly welcome (kindly note caveat on home page)

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