On the prime political purposes of this historically decisive time – 2

It’s most heartening – but also disappointing – to learn that a proposed course of action which I’ve oft contemplated as being best for countering Islamic terrorism has actually been seriously considered at top levels of government!

After Manchester, most people in their right minds will have said “Enough is enough” and want a decisive end to this pre-Medieval barbarity being inflicted upon the modern world.

An informative analysis by a visiting professor of war studies at King’s College London, Dr Andrew Roberts, and a well-informed reader’s letter in the Telegraph, on the necessity of banning the Muslim Brotherhood (per the unpublished official review into its activities) are followed by this real ‘eye-opener’ in Thursday’s edition:

Countering Extremism

‘SIR – In July 2013, following the murder of Fusilier Lee Rigby, former Labour Cabinet minister Hazel Blears and I, as members of Parliament’s Intelligence and Security Committee, wrote a paper for David Cameron’s taskforce on tackling radicalisation and extremism and gave evidence to it in person.

‘Our message was that we are well-served by our security and intelligence agencies in identifying and disrupting home-grown terrorists. However, we lack comparable capacity to neutralise the ideology which infects them in the first place.

‘We argued that, to prevent people from being radicalised and drawn into extremist activity, we should follow the precedents of the wartime efforts to expose Nazism and the Cold War campaigns to counter Communism. The extremist ideology of political Islam is a similarly totalitarian creed, requiring an organised effort to undermine its appeal and to strengthen the long-term resilience of the communities most vulnerable to it.

‘This work must be owned by the whole of government, on a cross-departmental basis, working closely with local government and engaging with civic and faith organisations on the ground. It requires the creation of a specialist counter-propaganda agency to develop a counter-narrative and to support communities in their efforts to challenge extremists. This agency should operate under the supervision of a permanent ministerial committee on which the Home Office, the Foreign Office, the Department of Communities and Local Government, the Ministry of Defence and the Department for International Development should all be represented.

‘Nothing which has happened in the succeeding four years has lessened the need for this overall strategy. Action against deluded individuals, however necessary, can never be a substitute for it.’

Dr Julian Lewis
Cadnam, Hants

Conclusion

In other words, a thorough, population-wide, education programme needs to begin but which will only be effective when the abusive term ‘Islamophobia’ is legislatively banned. Islam should be comprehensively compared with Christ’s life and teachings and the muddled and heretical notions of so-called ‘Chrislam’ renounced.

‘Archbishop Cranmer’ has long advocated, as in England has defeated religious fanatics in the past, and will do so again (emphasis added):

‘Let us not just teach our schoolchildren to wash their hands before they touch the Qur’an or to be sure to place it back on the highest shelf in a place of honour, but how to analyse, critique and understand it, and then freely to assent to or repudiate every word of it. This is a basic freedom: Christians have had it for centuries, and those who seek to dwell in a liberal democracy must respect the source of its community morality. It has been said before, but it merits repeating:

‘We need urgently to develop a ‘Prophetology’ – after the fashion of our centuries of Christology – in order to investigate the true nature and person of Mohammed as recorded in the Qur’an and Hadith(s). Then we might discover, or come nearer to understanding – as we have with Jesus – who Mohammed was; to whom he was born and how he was raised; what manner of prophet he claimed to be; what his relationship was with Allah; and what he might mean not only to the diverse ‘Islamic world’ but to non-Muslims the world over.’

Read alsoFive Things I Realised As A Muslim After The Manchester Attacks by Rabbil Sikdar.

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