Updates: the ex-Culture Secretary – the British Library

Maria Miller – no longer employed

For readers overseas unaware of UK news, Mrs Maria Miller resigned yesterday as Secretary of State in David Cameron’s coalition government. On Tuesday, the date of my posting, mainstream media were in manic-mode. Not taking time to do other than glance at headlines I noted some speculated that senior Tories wanted her out because of her role in redefining marriage.

Most of the anger was from voters over Parliament allowing MP’s to feather their own nest. Also many in government were ‘getting it’, even if Dave couldn’t. Today’s Times reports the Chancellor George Osborn led the revolt against the PM’s insisting that his Secretary of State should not go.

Too many ‘talking-heads’ spouted tosh about the issue but the simple scriptural fact of mocking God remains, as I’d pointed out on Tuesday. I’d already gone into depth at the close of 2012 on the grounds for questioning his poor judgement in deciding to change marriage (here).

Later, in Something good… I expressed concern over the personal responsibility the PM and his Secretary had both assumed in going against the holy foundations of marriage. It is there, at his position, where ‘the buck stops’ for what’s happened on his watch. If you’re interested, Peter Oborn, Telegraph’s chief political commentator offers some constructive points upon the PM’s paying the price for a grievous lapse of judgement, as here.

Will that price mean following in Mrs Miller’s footsteps?

Daniel Pipes – no longer banned

Further to one of his readers finding the British Library had blocked online access to his  websites, Daniel and a number of his subscribers contacted the Library direct.

He is pleased to report that their office admitted their mistake and promptly corrected it. They advised him this situation had occurred as a result of a software blocking facility, but he’s pursuing the matter further because it allows access to terrorist jihadi sites.

For details see No longer banned in The British Library.

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